5 Lessons from the World of Martial Arts

In a previous article, I mentioned that I was interested in martial arts. Any martial arts besides being “art” is definitely a powerful set of wonderful and useful skills. I realized that strength training and martial arts complement each other very well, and by ignoring one or the other, you are missing the entire package. Perseverance in both these forms of training is likely to turn you into a machine that cannot be stopped physically and mentally.

(Note: Of course, you should mix both strength training and martial arts to a preferred score. For example, there is no room in 6 strength training exercises and only two military sessions per week if your goal is to become a fighting heroine.)

So what have you learned from the martial arts world so far?

I have never enjoyed fighting even though I have been involved in several huge battles over the years. Some were successful, others did not. Fortunately, my ass was not fired on the street by a professional fighter. Is over in one shot.

What you probably don’t realize is that there’s a whole bunch of people who specifically train to beat anyone if they need to. Martial arts artists require their bodies to keep any punches and kicks, escape them, to be faster than you, to be quieter in case of fighting, punching and kicking more strongly, etc. In a potential showdown, they will have a tremendous advantage over you. To give you some perspective, even the average fighting artist must be able to quickly neutralize you because of his skills. A good military artist can hit you in seconds, and may kill you.

Will this virtual confrontation happen in real life? I do not know. The martial artist will only use his skills when he or his family and friends are in danger. Anyway, realizing the fact that you are fragile should make you think twice before starting a random fight for no reason.

This is true for any other area of ​​power as well. You should understand that reaching dangerous muscle mass, maximum strength, or stamina does not automatically make you a good fighter. Yes, I’ll show scare. However, don’t be ignorant – one minute liver shot while you are down. Low explosive kick and you will not be able to walk for a week.

Many people stop humbling and become shower bags once they become bigger and somewhat stronger. The truth is that size and power are not crucial in winning the battle. Specific blast strength, physical and mental conditioning, skills, knowledge of vulnerable human sites.

Finally, even if you practice martial arts and see yourself well in it, you should remain modest. Once you begin to believe that you are fast, strong and skilled enough, this is most likely when you get a realistic examination.

(Note: If you have seen the UFC 194 battle between José Aldo and Conor McGregor, you should understand that even the top players can be neutralized in one stroke)

Even in the Internet age, many martial arts instructors still believe in some old doctrines that are not supported by experience at all. My favorite myth is that strength training makes you slower and makes your muscles “very tense”. Many coaches advocate avoiding strength training to be a good fighter for this reason. Well, I’m hardly an expert in martial arts, but common sense and my experience in strength training tells me otherwise:

  • I firmly believe that the strength of the explosive leg developed with clean energy, leg swings, or sandbags, will complete the beating and kicking well;
  • I strongly believe that basic durability, string strength and ligaments designed with heavy composite exercises will help you at least get fewer injuries;
  • I firmly believe that muscle mass designed with strength training will help you to be slim and muscular more effective than being a 60 kg neck with 12-inch rifles or a heavy dove.

Again, in my opinion, strength training and martial arts are synergistic activities. They supercharge each other. Exercising both is definitely better than practicing either.

Despite the greatest minds that say that every martial arts has its own place and value, and that it must be treated with respect, there is still a lot of intolerance and ideas between different styles. It may be unofficial but it exists.

Typically, it is highly evident in traditional martial arts. Everyone thinks their style is the hardest. The truth is that mixing martial arts is the perfect way. Having your own style consists of a full range of traditional martial arts that suits you, making you a unique opponent that is more difficult to overcome than any traditional military artist.

“Grasp what is useful, ignore what is useless and add what is your own specifically”
– Bruce Lee

This article turned out to be fairly bleak but I just wanted to give it to you directly, like pear apple juice made from 100% pear. Anyway, the main point you will take here is to remain modest, open and respectful. It takes courage but it’s worth it.


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